Trump Signs Aid Package, Epicenter Is Now The U.S.

The $2 trillion economic recovery package is now law, as the number of COVID-19 cases in America approaches 100,000 and deaths near 1,500. A Johns Hopkins scientist weighs in on the idea of relaxing social distancing in select locations and the importance of more testing for coronavirus. And we explain when Americans could expect to receive federal stimulus money.

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Unemployment Claims Hit Record as Testing Grows — But Is It Fast Enough?

Weekly unemployment claims soared last week to nearly 3.3 million and Congress works to finalize a coronavirus relief package. Plus Anthony Fauci talks about the state of testing for Covid-19 in the US, and NPR’s Geoff Brumfiel reports on why more testing is critical. Also, a grocer in Maine reflects on the boredom and anxiety of working through the pandemic.

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Dr Anthony Fauci’s interview on ‘Morning Edition’

Details Emerge On Senate’s $2 Trillion Rescue Package

It would be the largest such stimulus package in American history. The Governor of New York says it’s not nearly enough. Plus, NPR’s Ayesha Rascoe reports on the confusion about the Trump administration’s use of the Federal Defense Production Act, and how one ER doctor in Seattle is coping on the front lines of the pandemic.

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Chef Amanda Freitag’s pandemic cooking tips and recipes

People should consider a prenuptial agreement

Couples getting married in Texas should explore the possibility of a prenuptial agreement and how it can help them. While these agreements may not be the right thing for everyone, they can provide valuable protection for people entering a marriage under certain circumstances. Although one may not want to enter a marriage planning ahead for its possible dissolution, it is sensible and can help protect one or both of the spouses.

Certainly, those who go into a marriage with significant assets need the protection that a prenuptial agreement can offer them. This includes people who either have a business or plan on starting one. Prenuptial agreements will help if they have their own money or their family has significant assets.

The benefit of a prenuptial agreement is that, in the case of a divorce, the property is divided in accordance with the terms of the agreement. The agreement can also protect children if the marriage is a second union by ensuring that a spouse can keep their assets and the children would not lose their inheritance in a divorce. A prenuptial agreement is not always easy to bring up and negotiate, but it is absolutely vital in many cases. The alternative is that a spouse can be at risk of losing their assets in a divorce.

While it seems paradoxical, one should contact a family law attorney before getting married to learn more about prenuptial agreements. They may be able to suggest parameters for a valid prenuptial agreement and give tips on discussing it with the prospective spouse. Note that the attorney will represent one spouse as opposed to both people. Prenuptial agreements could be invaluable and make life easier in case the worst-case scenario happens years into the future. An attorney might help prevent chaos in that event.


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Author: On behalf of Katie L. Lewis of Katie L. Lewis, P.C. Family Law

New York City, U.S. Epicenter, Braces For Peak

Governor Andrew Cuomo said the pandemic could peak in New York in the next 14-21 days — around the same time President Trump said he’d love to “open” the economy. Plus why the aviation and other transportation industries are lining up for federal bailout money, and a theory about why the virus might be so good at spreading.

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NPR’s Allison Aubrey reports on how to clean surfaces inside your home.
Listen to Atlantic journalist Ed Yong on ‘Short Wave’ on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or at npr.org.
Listen to ‘Wow In The World’ on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or at npr.org.

CA, NY On Lockdown; Mortgage Relief For Some Homeowners

Two of the hardest-hit states order residents to stay home in an effort to fight the pandemic. Plus what the World Health Organization has learned about the coronavirus in the months since it began to spread. And how homeowners could have their mortgage payments reduced or suspended for up to 12 months.

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Life Kit’s episode on how to spot fake news.
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GOP Senator Raised Virus Alarms Weeks Ago — In Private

U.S. Sen. Richard Burr, in a private luncheon, compared the coronavirus to the 1918 flu. NPR’s Tim Mak obtained a secret recording — more of his reporting is here. Plus how nurses are coping in the Seattle region, and why schools are struggling to make informed decisions about keeping kids home from school.

Check out Life Kit’s episode ‘8 Tips To Make Working From Home Work For You’ here.

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Why U.S. Coronavirus Cases Are About To Rise Dramatically

White House officials expect a spike tied to increased testing. Plus a guide to social distancing, a look at the grocery store supply chain, and a suggestion from NPR Music to take the edge off feelings of isolation and stress.

You can hear Life Kit‘s episode on social distancing, “Disrupted and Distanced,” here on Apple podcasts or at NPR.org.

You can stream NPR Music’s ‘Isle Of Calm’ playlist via Spotify or Apple Music.

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